'sukimasen' instead of 'taberaremasen'

This discussion was created from comments split from: What's the difference between "狡い kosui" and "狡い zurui".

Comments

  • phorntitaphorntita Posts: 1

    Hi! Could I use the word 'sukimasen' instead of 'taberaremasen' when I want to say this sentence >> kono tabemono wa taberaremasen. このたべものはすきません.

  • V1zi3rV1zi3r Posts: 18

    "sukimasen", can you tell me how it's written in Kanji? Is it from the Word "空く"?

  • V1zi3rV1zi3r Posts: 18
    edited May 31

    If by chance you mean "好きません" then the form is wrong, you should say "好きではありません"

  • anendtosnowanendtosnow Posts: 12
    edited June 1

    "好きません" isn't strictly wrong. It's just rare. I've never seen " 好く" conjugated like a typical verb before, actually. In any case, phorntita probably shouldn't use 「好きではありません」 or 「好きません」. Both mean something different from "食べられません."

    "食べられません" = "cannot eat"
    "好きません" or "好きではありません" = "do not like"
    There's a pretty big difference there if you're using the polite form and everything. I suspect people would take offense to being told you don't like whatever it is they're offering.

    Now phorntita, if you were referring to "空く" as in the one in "お腹が空く," then you could use "sukimasen." Your sentence is probably not usable, however. "この食べ物は空きません" seems to mean "the food is not hungry/empty" to me: meaningless either way. Maybe a Japanese person could use their 以心伝心 contextual superpower and stretch it to hear "the food (makes me) not hungry" from it, which is also kind of rude. I think "cannot eat" could best be expressed using "sukimasen" by saying something common like "お腹が空きません" if you really wanted to use the word. Regardless, it still means something slightly different; if "cannot eat" is because of an allergy, you'll probably want to say the original "kono tabemono" sentence.

  • V1zi3rV1zi3r Posts: 18
    edited June 1

    Precisely why I asked for the Kanji, It's too vague with just hiragana. While I know the rather plain difference between "don't like" and "can't eat" I always try not to assume my own standard into others especially when I have to judge their language proficiency. Btw I never heard of "好きません" before in my entire life and I've watched plenty of anime and played tonnes of VN, not that I don't believe you though

  • anendtosnowanendtosnow Posts: 12
    edited June 2

    :yum: Don't worry V1zi3r, I didn't mean insinuate you didn't know the difference between the two words or anything else untoward if that's what you're going for (not really sure what "assuming a standard into others" means). I just felt like typing out an overly long response that would answer phorntita wherever they're coming from because I have way too much free time now that video games are no longer worth playing.

    And yeah, "好きません" is really rare. I'll use this opportunity to point that out again; I don't think I emphasized that enough. It's like using the word "bigly" in English. It's technically correct, but I think most people would think less of you for it.

  • V1zi3rV1zi3r Posts: 18
    edited June 2

    No worries Anendtosnow :smiley: we're all here for a productive discussion after all and by "assuming a standard into others" I was referring to the fact that it would be arrogant of me to assume that phornita is a beginner who ask what seems like an obvious question as there might be more than meets the eye. All I'm saying is that there might be a chance that this "sukimasen" might be an old or irregular word that I have yet to know :smile: like there's this one time I played a visual novel and was surprised when I hear the word "古神" wasn't read as "furugami" or "koshin" but "inishiekami"

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